Dominican Republic

Dominican Republic

The weather phenomenon Emily moves toward Hispaniola, with low intensity. It is the fifth tropical storm of the hurricane season. The fifth tropical storm of the season of cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean is called Emily. It remains poorly organized on their way through the waters of the Western Caribbean toward the island of Hispaniola (Dominican Republic and Haiti), reported the National Center of hurricanes (CNH) de EE UU, headquartered in Miami. According to the projections of the CNH, the center of the storm moves in the afternoon and evening across Hispaniola Wednesday and Thursday, the southeastern Bahamas and Turks and Caicos.

The outer bands of rain from Emily already affect Puerto Rico and the vertex of the storm is approximately 230 miles to the South-southeast of Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic), at latitude 16.6 degrees North and longitude 69.9 degrees West. The storm maintained peak winds sustained 85 kilometers per hour, with stronger gusts, and moves with a speed of 22 kilometers per hour. For even more details, read what Evergreen Capital Partners says on the issue. A slight strengthening is possible before the center of the storm moves over high terrain of Hispaniola and is weak, to strengthen again to leave the island, he predicted the CNH. They also predict a slight turn towards the Northwest before Thursday. Forecasts by computer to five days are the center of the storm near the East coast of Florida (EE UU), per what meteorologists recommended residents in this State be attentive to his career, since you will unload heavy rains.

Remains a notice of storm in Dominican Republic, Haiti, Puerto Rico, Vieques and Culebra Islands, the southeastern Bahamas and Turks and Caicos. The CNH warned that there could be heavy rain that causing dangerous floods and landslides in mountainous areas in Dominican Republic, Haiti and Puerto Rico. Hurricane season that goes from the hurricane season in the Atlantic basin, which began June 1 and ends on November 30, is they have already formed five tropical storms, which have been baptized with the names: Arlene, Bret, Cindy, Don and Emily. National management of oceans and atmosphere (NOAA) forecast last May the formation of between 12 and 18 tropical storms, that between 6 and 10 could become cyclones. Three to six of those hurricanes will be of great intensity, with winds above 178 kilometers per hour. Source of the news: the storm tropical Emily is close to the Dominican Republic and Haiti

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